OLD EAST STONEHOUSE . UK
www.oldeaststonehouse.uk
 

  Brian Moseley, Plymouth
Webpage created: April 05, 2021
Webpage updated: April 05, 2021

 
OLD EAST STONEHOUSE.UK

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SAINT GEORGE'S NATIONAL SCHOOL

The origins of Saint George's National School lay in the founding of the Stonehouse Public School for Poor Children in 1811.  The School was held in the gallery of the Anglican Church of Saint George of Lydda, Martyr, until circa 1822/1823 when the School acquired its own premises in Quarry Street.

It would appear that a new building in Market Street was opened in 1851 at the same time that the land upon which it was built was granted to the Church for 1,000 years and the Stonehouse Public School for Poor Children ceased.  The new building became the Saint George's National School.  It had accommodation for 281 boys, 190 girls and 190 infants.

The average attendance in 1857 was 150 boys, 95 girls and 107 infants.

In 1889 Mr Henry J Bailey was the master in charge of the boys' school and Miss Eliza Howe was the mistress of the infants' school.

Following the adoption of the Education Act 1902 on June 1st 1903, the School became a "Non-provided" School under the Devon County Local Education Authority, possibly known as the Saint George's Church of England Elementary School.